Security Zones; Ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral, Florida

Summary:

The Coast Guard is establishing permanent security zones around certain vessels within the ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral. The security zones will prohibit entry into or movement within 100 yards of all tank vessels, cruise ships, and military pre-positioned ships when these vessels enter, depart or moor within the ports of Jacksonville and Canaveral. These security zones are needed to ensure public safety and prevent sabotage or terrorist acts against vessels in the COTP Jacksonville area of responsibility. Entry into these zones is prohibited, unless specifically authorized by the Captain of the Port, Jacksonville, Florida or his designated representative.

Table of Contents

Addresses:

Comments and material received from the public, as well as documents indicated in this preamble as being available in the docket, are part of [COTP Jacksonville 02-066] and are available for inspection or copying at Marine Safety Office Jacksonville, 7820 Arlington Expressway, Suite 400, Jacksonville, FL 32211, between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

For further information contact:

LTJG Drew Casey, Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Jacksonville, at (904) 232-3610.

Supplementary information:

Regulatory Information

On September 12, 2001, one day after the September 11 terrorist attacks, the Coast Guard Captain of the Port in Jacksonville established a temporary rule establishing security zones around tank vessels, passenger vessels, and military pre-positioned ships until October 3, 2001 (published on September 26, 2001, 66 FR 49104). Following these attacks by well-trained and clandestine terrorists, national security and intelligence officials have warned that future terrorists attacks are likely. As a result, on October 17, 2001, the Coast Guard published a second temporary rule in the Federal Register continuing these zones through 11:59 p.m. June 15, 2002 (66 FR 52689). The third temporary rule continued the zones through noon on November 15, 2002 (67 FR 41339). A fourth temporary rule continued the zones until January 30, 2003 so the Coast Guard can give adequate consideration to the comments received from the notice of proposed rulemaking (67 FR 55184).

On August 28, 2002 we published a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register entitled “Security Zones; Ports of Jacksonville, Canaveral, and Fernandina, FL” (67 FR 55184). We received one comment on the proposed rule, which is discussed below.

Background and Purpose

This rule creates 100-yard security zones around all tank vessels, cruise ships, and military pre-positioned ships when these vessels enter, depart or moor within the Ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral. No person or vessel may enter these zones without the permission of the Captain of the Port of Jacksonville. These moving security zones are activated when the subject vessels pass the St. Johns River Sea Buoy, at approximate position 30 deg. 23″ 35′ N, 81 deg. 19′ 08″ W, when entering the Port of Jacksonville, or pass Port Canaveral Channel Entrance Buoys # 3 or # 4, at respective approximate positions 28 deg. 22.7′ N, 80 deg. 31.8′, and 28 deg. 23.7′ N, 80 deg. 29.2′ W, when entering Port Canaveral or passes St. Mary's River Sea Buoy, at approximate position 30 deg. 40.8″ N, 81 deg 11.8″ W, when entering the Port of Fernandina. Fixed security zones are established 100 yards around all tank vessels, cruise ships, and military pre-positioned ships docked in the Ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral, Florida.

Discussion of Comments and Changes

We received one comment on the proposed rule from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), Seaport Office. FDOT expressed concern that the regulation, if implemented, would not provide security for sensitive land-based resources, such as waterfront storage tanks and petroleum facilities. FDOT's concern for shore-based resources is shared by the Coast Guard and is being addressed at the national level through separate security measures. See Maritime Security,67 FR 79742 (Dec. 30, 2002) (Notice of public meetings on Coast Guard national maritime security measures, including in Jacksonville, FL, on Feb. 7, 2003.)

A second concern from FDOT was that the NPRM did not prove that such a zone would prevent sabotage or terrorist acts. The Coast Guard has concluded that this rule is a necessary measure to protect certain high-risk vessels on the navigable waterways of the United States. The 100-yard security zones, although not guaranteed to eliminate all risk of sabotage or terrorist acts, will significantly reduce vulnerability and provide an enforcement mechanism if a violation occurs.

The third and final concern expressed by FDOT was that this rule would cause disruption to the movement of people and goods. First, this rule has been in place since September 2001 in the Jacksonville area and has not caused any noticeable disruption to maritime trade and transportation. Secondly, the Captain of the Port has discretion to allow a vessel to transit a security zone, if deemed necessary, to promote safe and efficient marine transportation. The environment in which the maritime industry operates has dramatically changed since September 2001. The Coast Guard believes these types of security zones, which only extend 100 yards around certain vessels, create the appropriate balance between efficient maritime transportation and necessary security in our new environment.

No changes were made to the proposed rule as a result of the comment received.

Regulatory Evaluation

This rule is not a significant regulatory action under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of that Order. The Office of Management and Budget has not reviewed it under that Order. It is not significant under the regulatory policies and procedures of the Department of Transportation (DOT) (44 FR 11040; February 26, 1979) because the impact of this rule on commercial and recreational vessel navigation is minimal because most vessels will be able to transit around these zone and the Captain of the Portmay permit entry into the zone on a case by case basis.

Small Entities

Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601-612), the Coast Guard considered whether this rule would have a significant economic effect upon a substantial number of small entities. “Small entities” include small businesses, not-for-profit organizations that are independently owned and operated and are not dominant in their fields, and governmental jurisdictions with populations of less than 50,000.

The Coast Guard certifies under 5 U.S.C. 605(b) that this rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities because small entities may be allowed to enter on a case-by-case basis with the authorization of the Captain of the Port.

Assistance for Small Entities

Under section 213(a) of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-121), we offer to assist small entities in understanding the rule so that they can better evaluate its effects on them and participate in the rulemaking process. If the rule will affect your small business, organization, or government jurisdiction and you have questions concerning its provisions or options for compliance, please contact the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT for assistance in understanding this rule.

Small businesses may send comments on the actions of federal employees who enforce, or otherwise determine compliance with, federal regulations to the Small Business and Agriculture Regulatory Enforcement Ombudsman and the Regional Small Business Regulatory Fairness Boards. The Ombudsman evaluates these actions annually and rates each agency's responsiveness to small business. If you wish to comment on actions by employees of the Coast Guard, call 1-888-REG-FAIR (1-888-734-3247).

Collection of Information

This rule calls for no new collection of information requirements under the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520).

Federalism

A rule has implication for federalism under Executive Order 13132, Federalism, if it has a substantial direct effect on State or local governments and would either preempt State law or impose a substantial direct cost of compliance on them. We have analyzed this rule under that Order and have determined that it does not have implications for federalism.

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1531-1538) requires Federal agencies to assess the effects of their discretionary regulatory actions. In particular, the Act addresses actions that may result in the expenditure by a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100,000,000 or more in any one year. Although this rule will not result in such an expenditure, we do discuss the effects of this rule elsewhere in this preamble.

Taking of Private Property

This rule will not effect a taking of private property or otherwise have taking implications under Executive Order 12630, Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property Rights.

Civil Justice Reform

This rule meets applicable standards in sections 3(a) and 3(b) (2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden.

Environment

The Coast Guard considered the environmental impact of this rule and concluded under Figure 2-1, paragraph 34(g) of Commandant Instruction M16475.1D, this rule is categorically excluded from further environmental documentation.

Protection of Children

We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and does not concern an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may disproportionately affect children.

Indian Tribal Governments

This rule does not have tribal implications under Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian tribal governments, because it does not have a substantial direct effect on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationships between the federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the federal government and Indian tribes.

Energy Effects

We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. We have determined that it is not a “significant energy action” under Executive Order 12866 and is not likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy. It has not been designated by the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs as a significant energy action. Therefore, it does not require a Statement of Energy Effects under Executive Order 13211.

List of subjects in 33 cfr part 165

Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reports and recordkeeping requirements, Security measures, Waterways.

For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR Part 165, as follows:

Part 165—regulated navigation areas and limited access areas

1. The authority citation for Part 165 continues to read as follows:

Authority:

33 U.S.C. 1231; 50 U.S.C. 191; 33 CFR 1.05-1(g), 6.04-1, 6.04-6, and160.5; 49 CFR 1.46.

2. A section 165.759 is added to read as follows: § 165.759

(a)Regulated area. Moving security zones are established 100 yards around all tank vessels, cruise ships, and military pre-positioned ships during transits entering or departing the ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral, Florida. These moving security zones are activated when the subject vessels pass the St. Johns River Sea Buoy, at approximate position 30 deg. 23′ 35″ N, 81 deg, 19′ 08″ West, when entering the port of Jacksonville, or pass Port Canaveral Channel Entrance Buoys # 3 or # 4, at respective approximate positions 28 deg. 22.7 N, 80 deg 31.8 W, and 28 deg. 23.7 N, 80 deg. 29.2 W, when entering Port Canaveral. Fixed security zones are established 100 yards around all tank vessels, cruise ships, and military pre-positioned ships docked in the Ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and Canaveral, Florida.

(b)Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations § 165.33 of this part, entry into these zones is prohibited except as authorized by the Captain of the Port, or a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant, or petty officer designated by him. The Captain of the Port will notify the public of any changes in the status of this zone byMarine Safety Radio Broadcast on VHF Marine Band Radio, Channel 22 (157.1 MHz).

(c)Definition. As used in this section: cruise ship means a passenger vessel, except for a ferry, greater than 100 feet in length that is authorized to carry more than 12 passengers for hire.

(d)Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231 and 50 U.S.C. 191, the authority for this section includes 33 U.S.C. 1226.

Dated: January 3, 2003. M.M. Rosecrans,

Captain, Coast Guard,Captain of the Port Jacksonville.

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